Teebaumöl

Teebaumöl aus Australien mit garantierter Reinheit durch ISO Zertifizierung.

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Tea tree oil is one of the best researched essential oils. Several studies found its antibacterial, anti-fungal and antiseptic properties. Even multidrug-resistant bacteria was killed reliably. Today it is used to treat acne, athlete's foot, nail fungus, vaginal fungus, mold, aphthae, gingivitis, warts, herpes and many other conditions. The leaves of were originally used by Australian Aborigines as a treatment for open wounds and intestinal diseases. Around 1770, it was introduced to the West by Joseph Banks and Captain James Cook. But it was not until chemist Dr A.R. Penfold was able to proof, that tea tree oil was 13 times more effective than phenol, that it came to be used widely - which it still is today.

Cultivation & extraction

Ysamin Tea Tree Oil is grown and produced in Australia between New South Wales and the South of Queensland – this is precisely where melaleuca alternifolia originally came from, and where it grows best. Climate, soil conditions and sunlight determine to a large extent the quality of the tea tree oil. The leaves of the tea tree need to be harvested at exactly the right time, or else the chemical composition of the essential oils will not be the same. The cultivation and processing of our tea tree oil meets the stringent requirements of the Australian Tea Tree Industry Association, which is committed to pollution-free and sustainable production.

Multi-resistant bacteria

The antibacterial efficacy of tea tree oil over multi-resistant pathogens has been demonstrated both in the laboratory and directly on the patient.

Tea tree oil has been shown to be effective in reducing MRSA-induced biofilm formation, which is common in chronic wounds. New studies are intended to show whether, in addition to containing existing infections, there is also a preventive effect. Here, the focus is on the development of new test methods that provide faster results and also already detect the pathogen and not first formed antibodies.

The antiseptic effect of tea tree oil can be partly attributed to increased activation of white blood cells. Antibiotics used in combination had no adverse effects on the concomitant use of tea tree oil. For a routine use in everyday medical life to combat multidrug-resistant pathogens, further investigations are necessary.


Fungal infections & Candida

Whether in the mouth and throat, on hands and feet or in the genital area - fungal infections (for example, with Malassezia furfur or Candida albicans) are among the common diseases of the population. In studies, tea tree oil proves to be a (sometimes even more effective) alternative to conventional medicines.

Tea tree oil has a growth-inhibiting effect, which is due to the alkenes and alcohols contained. These affect the cell wall and membrane of the pathogen cell, which ultimately leads to death. The best effect could be achieved by a combination of conventional remedies and tea tree oil. Even antibiotic-resistant pathogens had a significant susceptibility to tea tree oil in the laboratory.

The studies thus indicate a high potential of tea tree oil in the treatment of bacterial or fungal-induced diseases. Of course, further investigation is needed to prove the effect of acute or recurrent inflammation.


Skin and colon cancer

Whether in the mouth and throat, on hands and feet or in the genital area - fungal infections (for example, with Malassezia furfur or Candida albicans) are among the common illnesses of the population. In studies, tea tree oil proves to be a alternative to conventional medicines.

Tea tree oil has a growth-inhibiting effect, which is due to the alkenes and ber. These affect the cell wall and membrane of the pathogenic cell, which ultimately leads to death. The best effect could be achieved by a combination of conventional remedies and tea tree oil. Even antibiotic-resistant pathogens had a significant susceptibility to tea tree oil in the laboratory.

The studies indicate a high potential of tea tree oil in the treatment of bacterial or fungal-induced diseases. Of course, further investigation is needed to prove the effect of acute or recurrent inflammation.

ISO 4730:2017

According to a study by Dr. Ezra Bejar (2017), about 40% of all tea tree oil samples tested in Europe were found to be contaminated – either mixed with cheap eucalyptus oil, or other artificial additives. This leads, among other things, to unwanted side effects, allergic reactions and redness of the skin. Tea tree oils from potentially unsafe places of origin, such as China and some African countries, are to be treated with caution. For example, China exports far more tea tree oil than it can produce. Since customers are not in a position to detect impurities themselves, the ISO 4730: 2017 standard was created. It provides a guarantee that tea tree oil is 100% pure and of high quality. Only very few tea tree oils meet this high standard, and are certified as such. Ysamin Tea Tree Oil is tested at the Southern Cross Plant Science Analytical Research Laboratory in Lismore, Australia, immediately after manufacturing, and is fully ISO 4730: 2017 certified.

Studien

Hier finden Sie eine Sammlung und erklärung der wichtigsten Studien über Teebaumöl.

100% aus Australien

Unser Teebaumöl wird Südlich Queensland angebaut. Dort wo die besten Wachstumsbedingungen herrschen.

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        content: "Cpt James Cook sailed onwards to South Wales, where he observed large numbers of tea trees. He was told by the native Aborigines that an extract from the leaves has "miraculous" healing powers and can be used to treat abdominal pain as well as open wounds. Back in those days, open cuts were often a death sentence due to the high risk of infection. The Aborigines crushed the leaves into a pulp and applied it directly onto wounds. The antibacterial effect of the tea tree was so strong that even casualties with severely contaminated wounds made a full recovery. \r\n\r\n\r\n"
    -
        img: aboriginies.jpeg
        content: "According to reports, Cpt James Cook began to regularly drink tea made from these leaves; in all probability, this was the reason why he called the plant simply 'tea tree'. Subsequently though, the secret of the tea tree fell into oblivion, and it was not until 1925 that chemist A.R. Penfold rediscovered the healing effects of this plant. \r\n"
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        img: captainjamescookportrait.jpg
        content: 'He was able to show that tea tree oil was 13 times more effective than phenol (the antiseptic typically used at that time). During the Second World War, many Australian soldiers fell victim to “trench foot”; no conventional treatment methods seemed to work, until a doctor with Aboriginal heritage remembered the effects of the tea tree, and decided to apply pure tea tree oil to soldiers’ feet. This worked extremely well, and in many cases the fungal infection disappeared in a mere matter of days. As a result of this, a bottle of tea tree oil was made part of every soldier’s first aid pack.'
bottom: "Ende der Geschichte\r\n\r\n--- "
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## Geschichte & Herkunft

Teebaumöl wird vermutlich schon seit über 1000 Jahren von den in Australien einheimischen Aborigines gegen eine ganze Reihe von Krankheiten und Verletzungen eingesetzt. 

Dosage

At a dosage of 1%, no side effects generally occur. However, allergic reactions, redness or irritation of the skin may happen if tea tree oil is used improperly, or has been oxidised by age.

Pure tea tree oil can be harmful to health when in contact with mucous membranes, or if it is ingested. For your own safety, please always follow the instructions on the packaging. In addition, the following safety precautions should be taken at all times:

Warnings

No eye contact: If eye contact occurs, rinse with cold water immediately. If symptoms did not lessen after 20 minutes, contact your ophthalmologist. Do not swallow: If more than a teaspoon has been ingested, seek medical assistance. Allergic reactions: CCan occur up to 24 hours after exposure. If so, do not continue to use it! Pets: Tea tree oil is toxic for cats and aquatic animals. Children: Tea tree oil is not suitable for babys under 3 years. Keep out of reach of children. It may heighten the risk of gynecomastia. During pregnancy: Undiluted essential oils should not be used. Properly diluded, it is safe to use on the skin.